Detection of Coronavirus is still alive despite being treated at 60 degrees Celsius

British soldiers support sampling of the Covid-19 in London. Photo: Reuters.
British soldiers support sampling of the Covid-19 in London. Photo: Reuters.

France scientists try to raise the temperature to near the boiling point to disable the entire virus sample undergoing experiments.

In the experiment, the French team noted that the new strain of corona virus is able to survive for long periods of time under high temperatures, according to the South China Morning Post.

Specifically, Professor Remi Charrel and colleagues at the University of Aix-Marseille, Southern France, processed samples at 60 degrees Celsius for 1 hour. They then discovered that some virus samples were still capable of replicating.

Scientists must raise the temperature to near boiling to completely destroy the remaining virus, according to research results shared on medical literature bioRxiv.org on 11/4. This study has not received scientific reviews.

Remi Charrel’s team implanted the virus into the kidney cells of African green monkeys. The virus was sampled and isolated from a patient in Berlin, Germany.

The cells were put into a test tube, divided into two types of media “clean” and “dirty”, along with animal proteins. Experiment to simulate biological contamination in real specimens.

After treatment with high temperatures, virus samples in a clean environment were completely disabled. However, virus samples in dirty environments still partially survived.

The study found that high heat treatment significantly reduced the risk of infection, but the surviving virus was still able to start a new round of infection.

In an effort to combat Covid-19, the demand for testing in many countries increased, leading to the fact that test technicians had to work in less safe environments.

They are in direct contact with the patient samples, so the treatment process requires successful disabling of the virus before conducting the testing steps.

The method of sterilization at 60 degrees Celsius for 1 hour has been used by laboratories to treat samples containing many different viruses, including Ebola strains.

Research shows that laboratories are at risk of coronary infection if commonly used inactivation. Photo: Reuters.
Research shows that laboratories are at risk of coronary infection if commonly used inactivation. Photo: Reuters.

Remi Charrel and his colleagues found that this method only guaranteed to disable samples with low viral concentrations, but samples with extremely high viral concentrations were still at great risk.

Research by French scientists noted that when raising the temperature to 92 degrees C in 15 minutes, the virus is completely disabled. However, excessive heat can destroy the specimens and reduce the sensitivity of the test.

The scientists suggested that the health facility could use chemicals to neutralize viruses instead of the temperature method, and to find a balance between test efficiency and the safety of technical staff.

A microbiologist at the Chinese Academy of Sciences said laboratory facilities in the country were well aware of exposure risks for laboratory staff. All personnel handling samples should provide protection against hazmat, even when the virus has been deactivated.

However, he said the challenges in the field could be more complex than the lab environment. He said the new corona virus strain changed its response quite differently in different environments and needed more in-depth research.

Source: https://behecare.com/

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