US stops testing of anti-malarial drug Covid-19

Senate Democratic leader, Chuck Schumer, holds a vial of hydroxychloroquine antimalarial medicine. Photo: Lev Radin / Pacific Press / Pacific Press / LightRocket via Ge
Senate Democratic leader, Chuck Schumer, holds a vial of hydroxychloroquine antimalarial medicine. Photo: Lev Radin / Pacific Press / Pacific Press / LightRocket via Ge

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced the discontinuation of clinical trials of hydroxychloroquine antimalarial drugs in the treatment of Covid-19 patients.

The NIH on June 20 said that although hydroxychloroquine malaria did not harm patients, there was no benefit.

“The data from the study shows that this drug offers no benefits compared to placebo in treating Covid-19 patients,” according to NIH representatives.

The NIH kicked off a clinical trial of hydroxychloroquine in April at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville. The clinical trial was expected to be conducted on 500 patients, but it was stopped after 470 people enrolled.

On June 17, the World Health Organization (WHO) also stopped testing this drug in the pilot program to treat Covid-19 patients in many countries. Cause, the test results with drugs hydroxychloroquine did not bring therapeutic effect. The announcement came a day after scientists in the UK published clinical trial results showing that dexamethasone could reduce mortality in critically ill Covid-19 patients.

On June 15, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) also withdrew its decision to use hydroxychloroquine to treat people with nCoV infection in an emergency. The FDA believes that the potential risks of the drug are much greater than the therapeutic effects for patients. Hydroxychloroquine also did not show significant effect after a series of clinical trials.

Hydroxychloroquine has long been used to treat malaria and conditions such as arthritis and lupus. At the beginning of the pandemic, researchers believed that it had the potential to also effectively treat Covid-19. Laboratory tests have shown that the drug is capable of interfering with the nCoV process that invades human cells, but those results come from relatively small trials.

Source: https://behecare.com/

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*